The Importance of Milestones

I think I should have put a question mark on that incomplete sentence… But do you think it is important to mark a milestones? For example… Apparently, my last entry here was my 200th post. But I was completely oblivious to it, as for me writing is writing and I was just enjoying this while sharing things that I like. I mean, 100th post seemed quite cool at the time, but 200th doesn’t really feel as it has the same kind of importance. Maybe when I reached 500th or 1000th posts it would be worth a celebration? Maybe…?

Or, anniversaries. My husband and I don’t really celebrate that. Sometimes we thought of going on a nicer dinner together, but sometimes we just sit in our lounge — with him playing his computer game, and me knitting, or crocheting, or whatever please me at that time. Maybe when we reached 10 years, or 20 years, then it would feel worth a celebration? I don’t know. But it seems like unimportant for now…

But anyway…

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WIP… I think it is more interesting than my random mood of the day. WIP is doing well for now. I felt orange and blue don’t really mix, but apparently for some people it looks cute. I am making this for one of my in-laws.

Their family are really kind to mine, and flooded our house with gifts for my niece. So I think it is only proper if I make something that their baby loves too. And their baby loves Pororo. I don’t know if you have heard about Pororo. It’s basically a penguin in a blue and orange jacket. So, I thought… blue and orange jacket for the baby then…

Talking about jacket, I’ve been thinking of making a matching jacket for me and DH. It is a bit cold in here…

I know it is still summer, but my fingers and toes are freezing. Am I the only one feeling cold here? Am I a little bit under the weather and not knowing it, or something? Because it seems nobody was complaining about the summer being cold, and I am the only one feeling the chill… Am I being picked on by Mother Nature? *gasp*

x ❤ x

Woot Woot WIP…

It is amazing what a knitter can achieve when life is being kind enough to leave them alone with their WIP…

This is the first time I do a baby jacket with hoodie. It seems quite straightforward, although the instruction made it seems more complicated. Also… I am not sure why it needs to be blocked before it is sewn together. Oh well…

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The six pieces is done, after it is blocked, and put together, all I need to do is to do the button and buttonhole bands.

I am on fire! Woot woot!!

x ❤ x

Sew… Sew… Snip…

My goodness… this is an incredibly slow and boring project. I am pretty sure that there must be a more efficient way to to this. There must be a crocheting prodigy somewhere in this universe discovering a mindbogglingly simple technique that would save crocheters all around the world from having to do this…

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This is torture… 

Or maybe I just haven’t researched enough?

Lol. I don’t know. I just found this cleaning and securing the loose yarn like this is one hell of a boring job.

Luckily, I have found a new project to do. Remember I told you that my friend is pregnant, and doc told her that the baby is going to be a boy? Yep, Found a great pattern for baby boy, and have a wonderful yarn for it too.

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Did a swatch, and had to use larger needles to get an exact gauge with my normal tension. Which is handy because I don’t need to remember the tension, as it just naturally happens like that.

The pattern is Hazel from Rowan. Ribbing is k1p2. And I have to go to bed…

x ❤ x

Did I Say FO?

I did, did I?

I genuinely think that once the main bit is done, I could claim FO. But that’s never the case with granny squares, or in this particular one, granny triangles. Crocheting and joining the motifs is just HALF the work — the easy half.

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I always forget about this bit…

Yes. Tidying up and at the same time, securing them to make sure that it won’t just unravel itself when being worn, or washed. I… hate this stage of this project.

It is going to be a boring work, I better scour Ravelry to get a new project to do on the side… Pff….

x ❤ x

Tubular Bind Off? Never Heard Of It…

I think, one of the reason why knitting is always interesting is that there’s always something new to learn, even when you have been knitting for more than a decade. It doesn’t matter how experienced you are, there is always a new milestone to reach, always a limit to push.

I do really believe that this is why knitting is really good for one’s mental well being. Not only that it would give someone this sense of accomplishment when they’re finishing something, but also this sense of achievement when they are learning or mastering some new technique. Not only that it gives them focus when doing and following a pattern, but also this sense of purpose in doing so.

Seriously, I think knitted stuff are products of a labour of love. All handmade stuff are, actually… I was so chuffed when I was given a couple of hand made soap when we attended the wedding in Hungary few weeks ago. I mean… in the middle of all that wedding frustration, the bride had the time to make us these?

Damn I should have taken the photos before I took shower with it… have you noticed a pattern here yet?

Anyway… back to my WIP now. After taking ages to finish the k1p1 ribbing… I am so glad it is time to bind off. One step closer to wearing it — or giving it to my sister if it doesn’t fit >_<‘

The pattern called for a tubular bind off. I have never heard of it, so I googled it. I mean, what else can you do? I think we are lucky to live in this day and age, when you could just google what tubular BO is. I can imagine in the old days, people would have to scour the library, or go to Woman’s Institute to get some information about what tubular BO is.

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Tubular BO, is also called a Kitchener BO, or Italian BO. The finishing result is a seamless and ridge-less edge. I saw the example on youtube, and it was really pretty finishing. But of course, it would not be as simple as the usual BO I did in the past. Challenge was definitely accepted.

There are several ways to do this bind off, but they have the same principle. Basically, what you do is to create a “tube”, like socks, and do a kitchener stitch in the end — like you do the toe bit of a sock. You could do it exactly like you do sock — which means you need to separate the stitches alternately, and “graft” them with kitchener stitch — hence the name Kitchener BO.

Or you don’t — which means you don’t separate the stitches, and just sew it with different techniques. Like I said, there are different ways of doing it, just google it. It’s worth it…

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I do like the result. It does take a while to finish a couple of inches, but once I have got the hang of it… nope… still takes ages.

See you when I am done.

x ❤ x

This Picky Knitter Doesn’t Like Picking!

I love knitting. We all do. I mean, what would you do sitting down in front of the telly during weekdays while watching a rerun of NCIS? Knitting, obviously! But I have to say that there are some steps when I am knitting a piece of clothing, that I wish I could just skip.

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Sewing up is not too painful anymore

 

Several years ago, that would be sewing up and blocking. Nowadays, I deal with sewing up better. I could do mattress stitch relatively faster than I did a couple of years ago, and definitely much neater too. Blocking is not so much a big chore either because after I pin the piece somewhere flat, I can just leave it there and kind of forget about it overnight. No biggie.

BUT… as I learn more about knitting, learn more new tricks and techniques, and knit more, I realised that doing complicated thing is not the bit that I don’t like. Like Kitchener stitch, or three needles bind off — for examples, they are very useful and neat way of finishing, and I love it. It is the small, monotonic step that I wish I could just avoid, such as picking and knitting along the front and neck to make button and neck band.

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Ugh!

 

 

And then doing 1×1 ribbing!

My goodness that takes forever. So is my WIP… unfortunately…

x ❤ x