Did I Say FO?

I did, did I?

I genuinely think that once the main bit is done, I could claim FO. But that’s never the case with granny squares, or in this particular one, granny triangles. Crocheting and joining the motifs is just HALF the work — the easy half.

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I always forget about this bit…

Yes. Tidying up and at the same time, securing them to make sure that it won’t just unravel itself when being worn, or washed. I… hate this stage of this project.

It is going to be a boring work, I better scour Ravelry to get a new project to do on the side… Pff….

x ❤ x

While Blocking…

This pattern doesn’t have blocking instruction, but I think I could do with one just to loosen it up and see its shape before attaching buttons. Don’t know if that’s the correct way to do it…

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Oh… the Tubular Bind Off is fab! After awhile, I don’t need to keep referring to the youtube video to make sure I was doing the correct move, and it became quite easy to do. The result was a smooth ridgeless, seamless edge. Love it very much, and I think it works wonderfully with k1p1 ribbing.

While waiting for the blocking to finish, I continue on my other WIP.

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Remember this cute one I started as a project on the go, when I went to Edinburgh not so long time ago? I tried it, and I have to say that it does not feel too snug, although I am pretty sure that the size is slightly smaller than what was mentioned in the pattern.

Few more triangles, and I will have another FO! Yay for the productive Piggy!

x ❤ x

Whoops…

That is not the word you want to hear coming from your own mouth (especially) when you were in the middle of the WIP… It usually means that you either have to frog everything and start over, or you have to think how to wing it…

Now, before I admit what the potential disaster is, I would like to explain what’s going on about this crochet WIP.

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In the pattern, the individual triangles should have 9.5 cm length in every side, and 8 cm tall from the tip to the base. I know how important it is to make a swatch, especially when the pattern relies on the number of triangles you made — instead of the length of the piece as you knit it. So, I did measure the triangle, twice, and I even adjusted the size of the hook to achieve the correct size.

You know you’re going to hear a but, don’t you? Yes… BUT, I think the pattern did not take the shrinkage of the length caused by the joining of the triangles as you go.

You see? When you were joining the triangles as you go, by making a slip stitch into the chain space of the main piece, you inadvertently pinched a very small bit of the edge. I don’t know if this happens to other crocheter, but when I do this, it will take some milimetre worth of the edge… times twenty triangles.

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That’s the problem. In the end, after they’re joined in the round, I realised that the shrinkage on each triangle is then accumulated into a good inch and a half in circumference. I tried it on and it is still loose in my waist and chest so it might fit. I also count on the size after blocking, but I shouldn’t be too confidence that it will be anywhere closer to the size suggested in the pattern.

Yeah… a big whoopsie there 😦 But I think I am going to go through with the WIP, and see…

x ❤ x

Oops…

Okay… a few oopsie moments here.

First, the green wool has arrived. I have to say that the delivery is quick, so yes… if I had the correct colour I could start working with the repairing project. But, that’s the thing… IF I had the correct shade of green.

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Just so you know, I am not blaming the shop for sending me the wrong colour, because it must be my fault. I matched the colour with stranded cotton DMC shade 701, and it was correct… and I used this conversion chart here to get the code for the tapestry wool — which was 7042.

So, theoretically 7024 should match my green. That is the plan anyway, but apparently it is not quite so.

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When it arrived, it didn’t match completely. It was close. Very close. Probably the closest I have ever found, but I am pretty sure that if I use this wool, it would be quite visible. I know that my SIL wouldn’t mind so much, but I do… I mean, if I want to make something for someone I do care about, I would want to make it perfect, wouldn’t I?

Anyway, I would try the wool first, maybe when it is crocheted in it would be seamless. Let’s hope so 😦

The second oops is this…

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I have made it so far only to realise that I don’t have enough cotton yarn to make a full curtain. It might be enough to make one half a curtain (with some extra for the other half), or a cute lacy throw or afghan, or table cloth. I mentioned the table cloth to my husband though… but he wasn’t too enthusiastic having a cute lacy table cloth.

So… I have several options now. Make it as a throw or afghan to be use for summer, or… I could make one half of the curtains, and make as much as I can until I have got the chance to visit Indonesia again to buy the material to finish the project (means having a UFO for a while). What do you think?

 

 

Ooh… WIP!

I started to like this table cloth/ curtain project, although I am a bit confused with its name. Why is it named “Puritan crochet”? I mean, what does it have anything to do with it? Anyway… it doesn’t matter. I still like it.

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Well… I have to be honest, it was slightly confusing to start with because the chains kept twisting, and I am not good in keeping the tension. But after the second and the third squares things are getting a little bit more uniformed.

Now that I learned how to join squares as I go, I wonder why I didn’t learn how to do this much earlier. This reduced the extra work and the extra yarn, because I don’t have to sew it together. And best of all, it is just seamless, because the joint is not at bulky like when it is joined with needles and thread.

No.. I am serious. Look!

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I think it will look even more gorgeous once I have blocked the end product.

Anyway, my sister in law came with this new project for me. I have never done this before, and I think it is quite challenging. It is a repair work for her husband’s granny square blanket. I think I have seen some youtube video about how to repair granny square blanket. Let’s see if I could save this blanket 🙂

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We do have the wool for the yellow bits, but not yet for the green one. It might me a trip to wool shop to get the right colour. I know.. I know it might be much easier to make a new blanket, but I admire the sentimental value of this blanket. Apparently it was from my brother in law’s nana, as he is the Canary’s biggest fan.

Wish us luck 🙂

One Little Ducky

Modifying the hat to make a completely different hat is not as difficult as I thought it would be. Maybe because I have done some amigurumis in the past, so it might be helpful to know the basic crochet technique to make half a sphere shape.

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Making the beak, however is a complete try and error process. While I used treble crochet to do the hat, I used double crochet (UK term) for the beak. I found it easier to shape, and I also found it sturdier with DC, I need it to be sturdy, because the beak would serve as the hat’s brim too.

I made two of them with the lower part of the beak to be slightly smaller to imitate real beak, and I think it does look alright.

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I wasn’t really sure how I would like to do the eyes. I mean, I have seen some projects on ravelry to get inspiration, but I really didn’t want to use buttons nor safety eyes, because it would be slightly uncomfortable to wear. And it could be slightly dangerous too, just in case it got loose and got eaten by the baby.

So I decided to go back to basic, and made crocheted two circles using black yarn. I did try to use it together with white yarn to make them look more like an eye, but DH said just the black would give more cute effect. So I did what he suggested.

Tada!

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Let’s hope it fits…

x ❤ x